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Choereg – Armenian Easter Bread

This delicious Armenian pastry is a tradition that has been passed down from generation to generation. In English, choereg could be translated to “Armenian Easter bread”. The most important ingredient found in this pastry is the “mahleb”. This is what gives it its distinctive flavour and aroma. It can be found in Middle Eastern grocery […]

Greek-American Gyros

A great recipe for traditional Greek Gyros adapted for the American kitchen. This version is made with lamb, but could be made with a combination of beef and lamb, or all beef. The typical mix for Kronos gyros meat sold in the US is 85% beef and 15% lamb. If you go to Greece, we’re […]

Summer Squash Soup

This soup was created from the need to use up some squash and zucchini that was in the fridge. It turned out really good so I thought I should record it. It is all vegetable, and is low is calories.

Pakhlava

A deliciously rich sweet pastry – much more practical to make in the days of commercially prepared filo sheets. Our Aun-tay used to make her own filo dough, using a long stick to roll a golf ball-sized piece of dough to cover the kitchen table. “Baklava” and “Pakhlava” are the same word, the difference is in the transliteration from the original Greek and Armenian alphabets. You will find many varieties of Pakhlava in Middle Eastern bakeries, including rolled, queens and “bird’s nests”. This traditional layered Pakhlava, cut in a diamond shape, is most common. Pistachio nuts can be subsituted for walnuts. Greeks use honey in the syrup, Armenians do not.

Mrs. A’s Meatloaf

A classic American meatloaf. One of the best you’ll taste. Not Armenian, but in the family

Red Lentil Kufta

Lentil kuftas are a delicious vegetarian mezze.

Greek Avgolemono Egg-Lemon Soup

Classic Greek chicken soup.

Ben’s High-maintenance Meat Sauce

A great pasta sauce with just enough Italian sausage…

Christmas Sticky Buns

This traditional recipe was passed on from my great grandmother, Edith Love Newkumet, to my mother and then to my sister Bette.

Chee Kufta

Like its French cousin, Chee Kufta is a delicacy which is eaten raw. Only the freshest meat must be used. Grind it yourself, keep very cold and serve promptly.